HomeSearchRegisterLog in

Share | 
 

 Patriotic Indian Media

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
peace
Leading Member
Leading Member
avatar

Posts : 132
Join date : 2008-08-17

PostSubject: Patriotic Indian Media   Mon Aug 18, 2008 1:55 am

the indian media has acted patriotrically by reporting what new delhi wishes to and which is in the "best interest of the nation"..what role is indian media playing by having a biased coverage..??
Back to top Go down
Khan
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Patriotic Indian Media   Mon Aug 18, 2008 9:45 am

Thankyou ather for bringing the issue about biased Indian media. I feel that the Indian media is a circus more than anything else. They are a disgrace to fair and unbiased reporting. IF you have watched Aajtak or India Tv, these channels are more like a circus freak show than news media. They have stooped so low that nowadays they are showing aliens and 'eyes in the sky' and dragging these freak shows for hours altogether.

once again you ahve brought up a good point.

khan
Back to top Go down
peace
Leading Member
Leading Member
avatar

Posts : 132
Join date : 2008-08-17

PostSubject: great indian media show   Tue Aug 19, 2008 12:04 am

the coverage of some of the national news channels for today's events in srinagar when people had to assemble in TRC ground for presenting the memorandum to the UNO is beyond the limits of journalism..the gathering must have been around 10 lakhs and the headlines was seperatists march towards UN office when it should have been people's march..anycase in that case if the media is calling the people of kashmir as seperatists, yes they are..they want seperation from indian union..indian boxer losing the quarterfinal in olympics today got more coverage than the events in kashmir..i am surprised at doordarshan's coverage..other national news channels should take inspiration from them and learn how to cover the events..afterall doordarshan is more patriotic than others being government owned channel..
.......national channels should have covered the events more professionally..it was a people's gathering rather than some seperatists group's..one more kashmiri truck driver died in AIIMS hospital yesterday after he was attacked by a mob in jammu..that i didnt heard on any news channel because that would have hurt the sentiments of the secular india and was not in the best national interest..and even after this the indian voices are not ready to accept that there is road blockade..what else do they need.??
...national news channels have a responsibilty to bring the right picture infront of the people which they have miserable failed to do so till now..but that wont make an inch of a difference because its a global village now..we are in an era where there is internet and international media..u take a video and post it on internet..the world will come to know itself...
Back to top Go down
Mir
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Patriotic Indian Media   Tue Aug 19, 2008 6:41 am

August 17th, 2008
Breaking the taboo, Indian op-eds suggest Kashmir plebiscite
Posted by: Myra MacDonald
Tags: Pakistan: Now or Never, China, India, Jammu, Kashmir, Ladakh, Pakistan, plebiscite
The last time I visited Kashmir, in November, I was struck by an apparent contradiction: it was more peaceful than it had been in years, at least in the capital Srinagar, and yet the overwhelming mood was one of gloom. With the peace process between India and Pakistan going nowhere, there was a sense that thousands of people had died for nothing in the violence that had convulsed the region since a separatist revolt erupted in 1989. Although the soldiers had disappeared from the streets of Srinagar, and tourists were flocking back, it retained the some of the same tinderbox atmosphere that I had known at the height of the violence. One spark, people told me, could ignite it again.

When that spark came, in the form of a land dispute between Hindus and Muslims that triggered some of the biggest protests since 1989 (you can see my last posting on this here), the surprise was perhaps not so much that it happened but that so few analysts in Delhi (or Islamabad for that matter) saw it coming.

The sheer size and unexpectedness of the protests have prompted some Indian analysts to ask a question that has been anathema in Delhi for decades: Is it time to consider giving Kashmir independence, or at least to let Kashmiris vote on their future?

“If the experience of the last two decades has taught us anything, it is that the situation never really returns to normal. Even when we see the outward symptoms of peace, we miss the alienation and resentment within. No matter what we do, things never get better, for very long,” writes Vir Sanghvi in the Hindustan Times.

“I reckon we should hold a referendum in the Valley. Let the Kashmiris determine their own destiny. If they want to stay in India, they are welcome. But if they don’t, then we have no moral right to force them to remain. If they vote for integration with Pakistan, all this will mean is that Azad Kashmir will gain a little more territory. If they opt for independence, they will last for about 15 minutes without the billions that India has showered on them. But it will be their decision,” he writes.

“Whatever happens, how can India lose? If you believe in democracy, then giving Kashmiris the right to self-determination is the correct thing to do. And even if you don’t, surely we will be better off being rid of this constant, painful strain on our resources, our lives, and our honour as a nation? This is India’s century. We have the world to conquer -the other- and the means to do it. Kashmir is a 20th century problem. We cannot let it drag us down and bleed us as we assume our rightful place in the world. It’s time to think the unthinkable.”

The Times of India runs an editorial along similar lines. ”I was once hopeful of Kashmir’s integration, but after six decades of effort, Kashmiri alienation looks greater than ever. India seeks to integrate with Kashmir, not rule it colonially. Yet, the parallels between British rule in India and Indian rule in Kashmir have become too close for my comfort,” writes columnist Swaminathan Aiyar.

“We promised Kashmiris a plebiscite six decades ago. Let us hold one now, and give them three choices: independence, union with Pakistan, and union with India. Almost certainly the Valley will opt for independence. Jammu will opt to stay with India, and probably Ladakh too. Let Kashmiris decide the outcome, not the politicians and armies of India and Pakistan,” he concludes.


For two such reputable columnists to make a suggestion like this in national newspapers is extraordinary. India has long maintained that Kashmir is an integral part of the country. It has argued that giving up Kashmir would encourage secessionist movements elsewhere in the country and undermine its commitment to secularism by acknowledging that Kashmir, as a Muslim-majority region, could have special treatment. And it has traditionally blamed Pakistan for stirring up trouble in the region, convinced that if only Islamabad could be persuaded to end what it called “cross-border terrorism”, the benefits of Indian democracy and financial support would eventually win the people of Kashmir over.

Of course, a couple of op-eds calling for a plebiscite in Kashmir does not mean it is going to happen. The issue is phenomenally complicated, not least because the much-vaunted U.N. resolutions passed in 1948 calling for a referendum were meant to apply to the whole of the former kingdom of Jammu and Kashmir, now divided between India, Pakistan and China. The people were to be given the choice between acceding to India or Pakistan, but not of independence; while the resolution also required that Pakistan withdraw its troops first from its side of the region, followed by the bulk of the Indian forces, before a plebiscite were held.

And any vote, even within the Indian part of the former kingdom, could stir up bitter divisions between and within the three regions that make up the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir – Hindu-dominated Jammu, Muslim-dominated Kashmir and Buddhist- dominated Ladakh — that would dwarf the recent protests. Pakistan would also be faced with tough choices over how to handle the people on its side of the former kingdom, including Azad Kashmir and the strategic Northern Areas.

However, they do suggest a new thinking in India, which, determined to win its place as a global player on the political and economic stage, no longer wants to be dragged down by the Kashmir conflict. The question is whether this new thinking — coming at a time when Pakistan is struggling to reinvent itself as a civilian democracy — could contribute to a genuine effort towards a durable peace. Or will it simply make an intractable problem even more complicated?
Back to top Go down
peace
Leading Member
Leading Member
avatar

Posts : 132
Join date : 2008-08-17

PostSubject: from KASHMIR ADMINSTRATIVE SEE TO JAMMU ADMINSTRATIVE SERVICE   Wed Aug 20, 2008 11:41 pm

ALEE ANDRABI


Srinagar, Aug 19: According to a computation made by the General Administration Department (GAD) in 2005, for submission to the Sachar Committee, the state had roughly 3,52,000 employees. The Department worked out the percentage of employees to the total strength of respective communities. Hindu employees represent 4.61 percent of the 30 lakh Hindu population in the state whereas Muslims have a representation of 2.85 percent for the 68 lakh Muslim population. So relative to the respective populations, Hindus outnumber Muslims in the State government. This should question the ‘assertions’ of discrimination effusing from the winter capital. Ridicule them. Deflate them.
Scanning the composition of the State administration, the claims of discrimination do come home, indeed. The irony, though, is that the victim of this discrimination is not the ‘Pro National’ Jammu wala as we have been made to believe but the ‘Anti National’ Kashmiri, to put in the latest Right wing lingo. One, which is being endorsed by our wannabe Prime Minister L K Advani as well.
Starting with the Indian Administrative Service (IAS), the total cadre strength is 94 with 24 officers belonging to the Kashmir division, 27 officers belonging to the Jammu division and two from Ladakh. The other 41 babus are from outside the state. So where exactly is Jammu getting discriminated in all this? Delusion, but nothing! Further, most of the core developmental departments like Planning, Finance, R&B, PHE and Irrigation are headed by non-Kashmiris. Even the all important departments of Agriculture, Revenue, Social Welfare, Health, Home, CAPD, Industries and Commerce, Information, PDD are ‘endowed’ to non-Kashmiris. The trend is the same for Science and Technology, Transport and Culture. No Kashmiri components!
Another ‘discriminating’ fact, for the record. Since 1947, out of 26 Chief Secretaries of the State, only 6 have been Kashmiri Muslims. How’s that for discrimination for the only Muslim majority state of ‘secular’ India. But no one has ever stood up for this. Makes sense, in a way. Why would a Kashmiri Muslim civil servant take the ‘risk’ of speaking against discrimination engineered by a minority and be branded as ‘anti national’. Not worth it! Never was.
Now comes the real shocker. The Kashmir Administrative Service (KAS). This is where scores have to be settled, intriguing serious questions have to be asked, discrimination has to be debated and alienation of Kashmiri Muslims has to be addressed. Out of the 338 KAS cadre officers in the state, 155 officers belong to Kashmir division, 151 to Jammu division and 22 to Ladakh division. 10 officers are from junior KAS. Now how can this representation be fair, even ethical? This is unfair by any account of economic management or population distribution. The ratio is 55:45 in favor of Muslims but why has everything been worked out and settled at 50:50? It is not supposed to be that way. Kashmir outnumbers others in terms of population, but why is that they are outnumbered when it comes to Administration, Judiciary, Police and even Private enterprise? This preposterous idea of 50:50 distribution is absolutely fake, senseless by all parameters. Save your disappointment, resentment and protests for now though. Save them for the ‘administrative genocide’ I am about to illustrate.
From 2001 till date, 478 KAS appointments have been made. Kashmiris are at 106, Ladakh at 12 and Jammu at a staggering overpowering figure of 360. Discrimination? No, not by any standards. This is something far beyond the term, with devastating consequences for the majority. As I said ‘administrative genocide’, if you like. Engineering, competent and successful, has been done for the next three decades and things (read Kashmiris) have been leveled out for the ‘pro National’ Jammu bureaucrats. In fact it would not even make sense to call it KAS five years down the line. It will be, rather already can be, rechristened as Jammu Administrative Service (JAS). And here in Kashmir, we would even have to import BDOs and Tehsildars!
And mind you, Kashmiris are not overpowered in bureaucracy alone. It’s all across. Take for example the 641 Muslims and the 1015 Hindus figuring in the tentative seniority list of 1656 Junior Agriculture Assistants as of April 2006. Or for that matter the 114 Muslim AEEs in Works Department against the 164 Hindu AEEs as of May 2005. And be assured, it only gets worse after that.
The latest recruitments don’t show any mercy to Muslims or Kashmiris. Amongst the 429 Accounts Assistants selected by the Service Selection Board in April 2008, Jammu accounts for 334 Assistants while Kashmir gets a ‘fabulous’ 95. I am not even going to comment on that.
Of course, Raj Bhawan, the custodian of the constitutional rights of all sections of society remains off limits for at least one community, no prizes. The last Muslim Secretary the First Citizen of the state had was when we used to have a Sadr i Riyasat. Since then it is graciously adorned by the malis of Floriculture Department who are considered indispensable for their manicuring skills and presenting a gulab every morning to the sahib of the estate. However with the arrival of the present Governor two middle level Muslim officers from the former Chief Minister’s office are now manning the secretariat outpost of Raj Bhavan.
To conclude, all this is in complete sync with the latest branding of Kashmiris. Anti Nationals, at the end of the day you see.
PS: Yesterday’s piece on judiciary reflected only the current composition affected by deputation and transfers. The actual composition of the J&K High Court Bench gives Kashmir 6 slots and Jammu 6. Of these two from Jammu, Justice V K Gupta and Justice T S Thakur are already Chief Justices posted on deputation. Justice Bilal Nazki from Kashmir is a judge on deputation to the Bombay High Court.
The State Hugh Court has so far sent 3 judges to the Supreme Court, one of whom, Justice Anand, served as Chief Justice of India. The other two were justice Raja Jaswant Singh and Justice R P Sethi. You know their home addresses.
Back to top Go down
Koshur
Full Member
Full Member
avatar

Posts : 18
Join date : 2008-08-14

PostSubject: Arundhati Roy's Article calling for Kashmir's Independence   Sat Aug 23, 2008 3:33 am

The Indian government has slammed Arundhati Roy for mentioning that the Indians should grant us freedom. Here is the article that everyone is talking about: Thankyou Arundhati Roy for a beautifully written masterpiece.

Quote :
Land and freedom
by Arundhati Roy

For the past 60 days or so, since about the end of June, the people of Kashmir have been free. Free in the most profound sense. They have shrugged off the terror of living their lives in the gun-sights of half a million heavily armed soldiers, in the most densely militarised zone in the world.

After 18 years of administering a military occupation, the Indian government's worst nightmare has come true. Having declared that the militant movement has been crushed, it is now faced with a non-violent mass protest, but not the kind it knows how to manage. This one is nourished by people's memory of years of repression in which tens of thousands have been killed, thousands have been "disappeared", hundreds of thousands tortured, injured, and humiliated. That kind of rage, once it finds utterance, cannot easily be tamed, rebottled and sent back to where it came from.

A sudden twist of fate, an ill-conceived move over the transfer of 100 acres of state forest land to the Amarnath Shrine Board (which manages the annual Hindu pilgrimage to a cave deep in the Kashmir Himalayas) suddenly became the equivalent of tossing a lit match into a barrel of petrol. Until 1989 the Amarnath pilgrimage used to attract about 20,000 people who travelled to the Amarnath cave over a period of about two weeks. In 1990, when the overtly Islamist militant uprising in the valley coincided with the spread of virulent Hindu nationalism (Hindutva) in the Indian plains, the number of pilgrims began to increase exponentially. By 2008 more than 500,000 pilgrims visited the Amarnath cave, in large groups, their passage often sponsored by Indian business houses. To many people in the valley this dramatic increase in numbers was seen as an aggressive political statement by an increasingly Hindu-fundamentalist Indian state. Rightly or wrongly, the land transfer was viewed as the thin edge of the wedge. It triggered an apprehension that it was the beginning of an elaborate plan to build Israeli-style settlements, and change the demography of the valley.

Days of massive protest forced the valley to shut down completely. Within hours the protests spread from the cities to villages. Young stone pelters took to the streets and faced armed police who fired straight at them, killing several. For people as well as the government, it resurrected memories of the uprising in the early 90s. Throughout the weeks of protest, hartal (strikes) and police firing, while the Hindutva publicity machine charged Kashmiris with committing every kind of communal excess, the 500,000 Amarnath pilgrims completed their pilgrimage, not just unhurt, but touched by the hospitality they had been shown by local people.

Eventually, taken completely by surprise at the ferocity of the response, the government revoked the land transfer. But by then the land-transfer had become what Syed Ali Shah Geelani, the most senior and also the most overtly Islamist separatist leader, called a "non-issue".

Massive protests against the revocation erupted in Jammu. There, too, the issue snowballed into something much bigger. Hindus began to raise issues of neglect and discrimination by the Indian state. (For some odd reason they blamed Kashmiris for that neglect.) The protests led to the blockading of the Jammu-Srinagar highway, the only functional road-link between Kashmir and India. Truckloads of perishable fresh fruit and valley produce began to rot.

The blockade demonstrated in no uncertain terms to people in Kashmir that they lived on sufferance, and that if they didn't behave themselves they could be put under siege, starved, deprived of essential commodities and medical supplies.

To expect matters to end there was of course absurd. Hadn't anybody noticed that in Kashmir even minor protests about civic issues like water and electricity inevitably turned into demands for azadi, freedom? To threaten them with mass starvation amounted to committing political suicide.

Not surprisingly, the voice that the government of India has tried so hard to silence in Kashmir has massed into a deafening roar. Raised in a playground of army camps, checkpoints, and bunkers, with screams from torture chambers for a soundtrack, the young generation has suddenly discovered the power of mass protest, and above all, the dignity of being able to straighten their shoulders and speak for themselves, represent themselves. For them it is nothing short of an epiphany. Not even the fear of death seems to hold them back. And once that fear has gone, of what use is the largest or second largest army in the world?

There have been mass rallies in the past, but none in recent memory that have been so sustained and widespread. The mainstream political parties of Kashmir - National Conference and People's Democratic party - appear dutifully for debates in New Delhi's TV studios, but can't muster the courage to appear on the streets of Kashmir. The armed militants who, through the worst years of repression were seen as the only ones carrying the torch of azadi forward, if they are around at all, seem content to take a back seat and let people do the fighting for a change.

The separatist leaders who do appear and speak at the rallies are not leaders so much as followers, being guided by the phenomenal spontaneous energy of a caged, enraged people that has exploded on Kashmir's streets. Day after day, hundreds of thousands of people swarm around places that hold terrible memories for them. They demolish bunkers, break through cordons of concertina wire and stare straight down the barrels of soldiers' machine guns, saying what very few in India want to hear. Hum Kya Chahtey? Azadi! (We want freedom.) And, it has to be said, in equal numbers and with equal intensity: Jeevey jeevey Pakistan. (Long live Pakistan.)

That sound reverberates through the valley like the drumbeat of steady rain on a tin roof, like the roll of thunder during an electric storm.

On August 15, India's independence day, Lal Chowk, the nerve centre of Srinagar, was taken over by thousands of people who hoisted the Pakistani flag and wished each other "happy belated independence day" (Pakistan celebrates independence on August 14) and "happy slavery day". Humour obviously, has survived India's many torture centres and Abu Ghraibs in Kashmir.

On August 16 more than 300,000 people marched to Pampore, to the village of the Hurriyat leader, Sheikh Abdul Aziz, who was shot down in cold blood five days earlier.

On the night of August 17 the police sealed the city. Streets were barricaded, thousands of armed police manned the barriers. The roads leading into Srinagar were blocked. On the morning of August 18, people began pouring into Srinagar from villages and towns across the valley. In trucks, tempos, jeeps, buses and on foot. Once again, barriers were broken and people reclaimed their city. The police were faced with a choice of either stepping aside or executing a massacre. They stepped aside. Not a single bullet was fired.

The city floated on a sea of smiles. There was ecstasy in the air. Everyone had a banner; houseboat owners, traders, students, lawyers, doctors. One said: "We are all prisoners, set us free." Another said: "Democracy without freedom is demon-crazy." Demon-crazy. That was a good one. Perhaps he was referring to the insanity that permits the world's largest democracy to administer the world's largest military occupation and continue to call itself a democracy.

There was a green flag on every lamp post, every roof, every bus stop and on the top of chinar trees. A big one fluttered outside the All India Radio building. Road signs were painted over. Rawalpindi they said. Or simply Pakistan. It would be a mistake to assume that the public expression of affection for Pakistan automatically translates into a desire to accede to Pakistan. Some of it has to do with gratitude for the support - cynical or otherwise - for what Kashmiris see as their freedom struggle, and the Indian state sees as a terrorist campaign. It also has to do with mischief. With saying and doing what galls India most of all. (It's easy to scoff at the idea of a "freedom struggle" that wishes to distance itself from a country that is supposed to be a democracy and align itself with another that has, for the most part been ruled by military dictators. A country whose army has committed genocide in what is now Bangladesh. A country that is even now being torn apart by its own ethnic war. These are important questions, but right now perhaps it's more useful to wonder what this so-called democracy did in Kashmir to make people hate it so?)

Everywhere there were Pakistani flags, everywhere the cry Pakistan se rishta kya? La illaha illallah. (What is our bond with Pakistan? There is no god but Allah.) Azadi ka matlab kya? La illaha illallah. (What does freedom mean? There is no god but Allah.)

For somebody like myself, who is not Muslim, that interpretation of freedom is hard - if not impossible - to understand. I asked a young woman whether freedom for Kashmir would not mean less freedom for her, as a woman. She shrugged and said "What kind of freedom do we have now? The freedom to be raped by Indian soldiers?" Her reply silenced me.

Surrounded by a sea of green flags, it was impossible to doubt or ignore the deeply Islamic fervour of the uprising taking place around me. It was equally impossible to label it a vicious, terrorist jihad. For Kashmiris it was a catharsis. A historical moment in a long and complicated struggle for freedom with all the imperfections, cruelties and confusions that freedom struggles have. This one cannot by any means call itself pristine, and will always be stigmatised by, and will some day, I hope, have to account for, among other things, the brutal killings of Kashmiri Pandits in the early years of the uprising, culminating in the exodus of almost the entire Hindu community from the Kashmir valley.

As the crowd continued to swell I listened carefully to the slogans, because rhetoric often holds the key to all kinds of understanding. There were plenty of insults and humiliation for India: Ay jabiron ay zalimon, Kashmir hamara chhod do (Oh oppressors, Oh wicked ones, Get out of our Kashmir.) The slogan that cut through me like a knife and clean broke my heart was this one: Nanga bhookha Hindustan, jaan se pyaara Pakistan. (Naked, starving India, More precious than life itself - Pakistan.)

Why was it so galling, so painful to listen to this? I tried to work it out and settled on three reasons. First, because we all know that the first part of the slogan is the embarrassing and unadorned truth about India, the emerging superpower. Second, because all Indians who are not nanga or bhooka are and have been complicit in complex and historical ways with the elaborate cultural and economic systems that make Indian society so cruel, so vulgarly unequal. And third, because it was painful to listen to people who have suffered so much themselves mock others who suffer, in different ways, but no less intensely, under the same oppressor. In that slogan I saw the seeds of how easily victims can become perpetrators.

Syed Ali Shah Geelani began his address with a recitation from the Qur'an. He then said what he has said before, on hundreds of occasions. The only way for the struggle to succeed, he said, was to turn to the Qur'an for guidance. He said Islam would guide the struggle and that it was a complete social and moral code that would govern the people of a free Kashmir. He said Pakistan had been created as the home of Islam, and that that goal should never be subverted. He said just as Pakistan belonged to Kashmir, Kashmir belonged to Pakistan. He said minority communities would have full rights and their places of worship would be safe. Each point he made was applauded.

I imagined myself standing in the heart of a Hindu nationalist rally being addressed by the Bharatiya Janata party's (BJP) LK Advani. Replace the word Islam with the word Hindutva, replace the word Pakistan with Hindustan, replace the green flags with saffron ones and we would have the BJP's nightmare vision of an ideal India.

Is that what we should accept as our future? Monolithic religious states handing down a complete social and moral code, "a complete way of life"? Millions of us in India reject the Hindutva project. Our rejection springs from love, from passion, from a kind of idealism, from having enormous emotional stakes in the society in which we live. What our neighbours do, how they choose to handle their affairs does not affect our argument, it only strengthens it.

Arguments that spring from love are also fraught with danger. It is for the people of Kashmir to agree or disagree with the Islamist project (which is as contested, in equally complex ways, all over the world by Muslims, as Hindutva is contested by Hindus). Perhaps now that the threat of violence has receded and there is some space in which to debate views and air ideas, it is time for those who are part of the struggle to outline a vision for what kind of society they are fighting for. Perhaps it is time to offer people something more than martyrs, slogans and vague generalisations. Those who wish to turn to the Qur'an for guidance will no doubt find guidance there. But what of those who do not wish to do that, or for whom the Qur'an does not make place? Do the Hindus of Jammu and other minorities also have the right to self-determination? Will the hundreds of thousands of Kashmiri Pandits living in exile, many of them in terrible poverty, have the right to return? Will they be paid reparations for the terrible losses they have suffered? Or will a free Kashmir do to its minorities what India has done to Kashmiris for 61 years? What will happen to homosexuals and adulterers and blasphemers? What of thieves and lafangas and writers who do not agree with the "complete social and moral code"? Will we be put to death as we are in Saudi Arabia? Will the cycle of death, repression and bloodshed continue? History offers many models for Kashmir's thinkers and intellectuals and politicians to study. What will the Kashmir of their dreams look like? Algeria? Iran? South Africa? Switzerland? Pakistan?

cntd on next post..


Last edited by Koshur on Sat Aug 23, 2008 3:36 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top Go down
Koshur
Full Member
Full Member
avatar

Posts : 18
Join date : 2008-08-14

PostSubject: Re: Patriotic Indian Media   Sat Aug 23, 2008 3:34 am

continued from previous post....

Quote :
At a crucial time like this, few things are more important than dreams. A lazy utopia and a flawed sense of justice will have consequences that do not bear thinking about. This is not the time for intellectual sloth or a reluctance to assess a situation clearly and honestly.

Already the spectre of partition has reared its head. Hindutva networks are alive with rumours about Hindus in the valley being attacked and forced to flee. In response, phone calls from Jammu reported that an armed Hindu militia was threatening a massacre and that Muslims from the two Hindu majority districts were preparing to flee. Memories of the bloodbath that ensued and claimed the lives of more than a million people when India and Pakistan were partitioned have come flooding back. That nightmare will haunt all of us forever.

However, none of these fears of what the future holds can justify the continued military occupation of a nation and a people. No more than the old colonial argument about how the natives were not ready for freedom justified the colonial project.

Of course there are many ways for the Indian state to continue to hold on to Kashmir. It could do what it does best. Wait. And hope the people's energy will dissipate in the absence of a concrete plan. It could try and fracture the fragile coalition that is emerging. It could extinguish this non-violent uprising and re-invite armed militancy. It could increase the number of troops from half a million to a whole million. A few strategic massacres, a couple of targeted assassinations, some disappearances and a massive round of arrests should do the trick for a few more years.

The unimaginable sums of public money that are needed to keep the military occupation of Kashmir going is money that ought by right to be spent on schools and hospitals and food for an impoverished, malnutritioned population in India. What kind of government can possibly believe that it has the right to spend it on more weapons, more concertina wire and more prisons in Kashmir?

The Indian military occupation of Kashmir makes monsters of us all. It allows Hindu chauvinists to target and victimise Muslims in India by holding them hostage to the freedom struggle being waged by Muslims in Kashmir.

India needs azadi from Kashmir just as much as - if not more than - Kashmir needs azadi from India.

· Arundhati Roy, 2008.
Back to top Go down
Yoo
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Patriotic Indian Media   Sat Aug 23, 2008 3:44 am

I hope we have more people of conscience like her on our side among the Indians. But considering what they have to face, a lot are remaining silent. Here is a news item regarding this in the Hindustan Times:

Quote :
The Centre has been watching all this helplessly. Mr. Javadekar demanded that the government should try writer and social activist Arundhati Roy for “treason” for her views on Kashmir. “India can live without Arundhati Roy, not without Kashmir,” Mr. Javadekar said.
source http://www.hindu.com/2008/08/21/stories/2008082160501200.htm
Back to top Go down
Adi
Guest



PostSubject: debating on Kashmir   Sat Aug 23, 2008 10:12 pm

don't know if this is relevant to the current thead, but wanna say a few words...

for the past few days i have been following quite a few blogs and websites on kashmir and have been following events in kashmir ever since i visited the place on a beautiful road trip early this summer. not that i profess to be an authority on kashmiri history or kashmiri culture, right now i sit far away in the southern part of india, but i did notice one thing in almost all places on the internet...
-people on both sides making unnecessary statements out of a strong emotional rush or strong bias, with absolutely no regard for facts or ground reality or real sentiments of people...which kinda shows up in the comments to a non-emotional eye
-belittling each others religion and beliefs, which i consider is most shameful and disgusting.
-trying to incessantly blame each other for all the wrongs in the past, which, in my opinion is not going to help anyone.
a meaningful debate is what is needed and will be appreciated...you can curse me and i can curse you and we go on forever.

I'm a proud to be an Indian as much any kashmiri is proud to be a Kashmiri. I'd respect his/her sense of freedom as much as I do mine. but i strongly object to all those fighting this cause in the name of Islam, and to all those fighting back in the name of Hindutva, cause you all are wrong to think your faith gives you a license to hate the other and tear up geographies in the name of religion (i was particularly disturbed reading geelani's rhetoric). I have been reading some really awful rants from people from both, mocking each other of poverty, social drawbacks etc and blowing ones trumpet about their achievements etc...i disagree, problems are faced by every developing country including china...every country has its problems, if Kashmir were to be independent someday...it would face it's own set of problems and i won't be someone to mock at it.
as i mentioned on koshur's blog all indians aren't evil like the way it is painted, there are more who acknowledge the fact that grave mistakes have happened and there are a lot, including me who want to sincerely undo it, but remains skeptical to me, considering the amount of anger kashmiris seem to be venting against indians and the amount if indifference the government seems to be showing in taking a step forward, i hope there is a meaningful dialogue on this one issue.

and to all the indians commenting here...i think we need to be fair and just when it comes to debating on kashmir and not simply rant with all the vocabulary we know because we can...for six decades people screwed up right from india's nehru and pakistan's jinnah to the current governments, things could have been a lot different, we made a lot of mistakes, and we did a lot of good too, but in the end, if people of kashmir say the harm has been more than the good, i think it's only just they get what they need. plain emotion and things like 'how can we give away kashmir?' won't help...on the contrary, it might just help india in a lot of ways. it will not harm the secular fabric of india or our economic progress in any way.
Back to top Go down
hated-in
Guest



PostSubject: Idots of the day   Fri Aug 29, 2008 2:19 pm

I hearby nominate BJP president Rajnath Singh and Hurriyat Conference "Idots of the day". Both should be put in Jail for two years under Public Safety Act (PSA) without trial.

Quote :

Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) chief Rajnath Singh said here Thursday.”The state government will have to accept the demand of the Amarnath Sangarsh Samiti that is demanding restoration of land to the Amarnath Shrine Board,” he told reporters here.

Quote :

Worried over the “well-being” of its leaders arrested earlier this week, separatist Hurriyat Conference Thursday said it was “surprised at the silence of Pakistan over Kashmir”.

Code:

See:
http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/uncategorized/separatists-surprised-over-pakistans-silence-on-kashmir-lead_10089836.html

http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/uncategorized/jammu-and-kashmir-government-should-return-land-bjp_10089816.html
Back to top Go down
hated-in
Guest



PostSubject: Sensible comments of the day   Fri Aug 29, 2008 2:26 pm

Quote :

"We appeal to the administration led by Governor N N Vohra to lift curfew forthwith and provide relief to the people who are facing acute shortage of essentials," senior National Conference leaders and former ministers Mian Altaf Ahmad, Choudhary Mohammad Ramzan, Mustafa Kamal and provincial president, Kashmir, Mehboob Beig said in a joint statement in Srinagar.

Quote :

Contending that the “great social and cultural harmony” represented by India was being questioned, he underlined that “enduring solutions” can be found only through discussion and the democratic process within the framework of the Constitution.

“Some people do not appreciate that the very ethos of being Indian is to accept different streams of thought, faith, caste and language,” Manmohan Singh said in a speech which was read out at a public meeting here Aug 25 in his absence as his helicopter could not land due to bad weather.

Code:

http://www.hindustantimes.com/StoryPage/StoryPage.aspx?id=fc67c9ab-d7b5-4c50-97a9-779ffbb1eb5e&ParentID=ae3ac80f-11da-47c8-ab3c-d23cc58cfa76&&Headline=Lift+curfew+and+curb+use+of+force+in+J%26amp%3bK%3a+NC

http://www.indiajournal.com/pages/event.php?id=4348
Back to top Go down
corekashmiri
Full Member
Full Member


Posts : 29
Join date : 2008-08-12

PostSubject: Rollercoaster public opinion in the Kashmir valley   Fri Aug 29, 2008 10:20 pm

Rollercoaster public opinion in the Kashmir valley

The first thing to understand about the people of the Kashmir valley is that their views are fickle and can see radical changes.

In 1947, in the wake of the tribal invasion led and masterminded by Pakistan, the valley welcomed the Indian Army with open arms. One of INPAD's members, retired Lieutenant General Eric Vas remembers that the soldiers were showered with rose petals. It was thanks to Sheikh Abdullah's secular leadership as well as the Sufi tradition that Kashmiris rejected the poisonous Muslim League propaganda. In 1965, when Pakistan repeated the 1947 feat and sent in infiltrators, there were very few takers for the idea of merger with Pakistan and the infiltration failed to achieve the goal of engendering an insurrection.

In 1975-1976, when Sheikh Abdullah was the chief minister, there was a widespread movement in Pakistan occupied Kashmir to march to Indian Kashmir -- an exact opposite of the present Kashmiri slogan of 'Chalo Muzaffarabad'.

On April 1, 1979, Zulfikar Ali Bhutto was hanged by military dictator Zia-ul Haq. His hanging sparked off large-scale violence in the Kashmir valley. Those owing allegiance to the Jamaat-i-Islami, led by Syed Ali Shah Geelani, were the main target of attack. Their houses were destroyed by firebombs. The provocation: The Jamaat had distributed sweets to celebrate Bhutto's hanging. It was the Indian Army that rescued Geelani and his people.

On April 4, 1979, Kashmiris held a massive congregation in Hazratbal to thank Allah that they were a part of India and paraded a donkey with a placard that read 'I am Zia-ul Haq'.

The flip side

Post-1947 support for India vanished in a few years. In the late 1950s when Nehru sent Haribhau Pataskar to gauge public opinion in the valley (in order to hold the referendum he had promised), Pataskar told him that the valley was all for joining Pakistan.

Sheikh Abdullah, who was elevated to the status of 'Pir' (holy man) by Kashmiris, fared no better. He died in 1982. Within seven years, his birth and death anniversary became occasions to burn his effigy. A police guard was placed to protect his grave from vandalism. He now became the 'great betrayer' from his erstwhile position of 'Lion of Kashmir'.

Zia-ul Haq, the Pakistani dictator, saw a total reversal of fortunes. His bemedalled photographs began to adorn the homes of Kashmiris.

The late Hamid Dalwai, a Muslim reformist from Maharashtra, recounted his encounters in Kashmir that aptly sums up the reasons for Kashmiri flip-flop. He asked several people as to why they were unhappy in India. The answer given to him by one shikara owner was that they had everything going for them in India, "but after all, must we not care for the flag of Islam?"
Back to top Go down
peace
Leading Member
Leading Member
avatar

Posts : 132
Join date : 2008-08-17

PostSubject: local news channels banned   Fri Aug 29, 2008 11:32 pm

Cable operators set 24-hr deadline for withdrawal of ban

M FAROOQ SHAH



Srinagar, Aug 28: The cable operators in Kashmir have taken all the Indian and foreign television news channels, including CNN-IBN, Times Now, NDTV, Zee News, Aaj Tak, Al-Jazeera, and BBC off the air from Thursday afternoon in protest against the alleged intimidation and harassment by government agencies and the role played by the local representatives of some Indian TV channels. They have set a 24-hour deadline for the government to withdraw the recent orders banning the telecast of news and current affairs programmes by them. "If we're not allowed to broadcast the news and current affairs programmes with 24 hours, we'll suspend our entire network indefinitely," the president of the Kashmir Cable Operators Association, Mir Amjad, told Greater Kashmir, soon after a meeting of his association. The decision is understood to have been prompted by a chain of recent developments which culminated into the "temporary" ban on telecast of news and current affairs programmes by them early this week. Well placed sources told Greater Kashmir the authorities had been pressurizing the local television channels to slash their news and current affairs time drastically "as these were generally inconvenient" for the government. "You should reduce your news time from one hour to just 10 or 15 minutes," the authorities had told them. They said the channel operators expressed their reluctance to oblige for fear of offending their viewers, who would accuse them of downplaying the atrocities being perpetrated on people allegedly by the police and security forces. Sources said the Association office-bearers were summoned on Wednesday. "To sort out the matters," in view of the international criticism over the recent ban. A senior police official is understood to have repeated the earlier demand to reduce the news time to just 10 or 15 minutes and also tried to browbeat them on one pretext or other. "We told him that unlike in Jammu where the government had withdrawn a similar ban in just six hours, we were not being allowed to resume the newscasts even after five days," they said, quoting a cable operator who attended the meeting. During their meeting, the officials are understood to have drawn a distinction between Jammu and Kashmir asserting the two could not be treated evenly. The cable operators told them they had been maintaining high standards of journalism and objectivity in their news reporting. Another meeting is believed to have been held on Thursday between the cable operators and the authorities. However, it was after these meetings that the cable operators came to know about the "dirty role" played by the representatives of some Indian television channels in getting their news and current affairs telecasts banned by the authorities and, as a retaliatory step, decided to take their (Indian news televisions) telecasts off the air. The ball is now in the government's court. With the local newspapers unable to hit the stands for the fifth consecutive day, sources said, the government may find it very hard even to communicate its own viewpoint to the people. And, in the resultant gap, the rumour mongers could have the better of public attention with unforeseen consequences. Incidentally, the rise in popularity of the local television channels is believed to have adversely affected the standing of some New Delhi-based TV channels, who have been accused of "blacking out" the news related to the recent massive rallies in the valley. On occasions, their local representatives too have had to face the public wrath even though they might have filed objective reports to their organizations. Meanwhile, an international organization, Reporters Without Borders, had called on the Indian authorities to put an immediate halt to the censorship and violence against media in Kashmir. International pressure is mounting on India to lift the curbs on Kashmir media. "This latest crisis must not be used as a pretext for subjecting the press to more violence and obstruction," it said. Another organization, the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) on Tuesday condemned restrictions on media imposed by security forces trying to quell unrest. The International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) has also expressed its anguish over the attacks on media persons that left a local photojournalist dead and fifteen others injured in the spate of violence against the media prompted by a wave of protests in the wake of the economic blockade enforced by the fanatics of Jammu and some Indian states. The United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) has voiced its concern about the recent violent protests leading to civilian casualties and restrictions to the right to freedom of assembly and expression. "OHCHR calls on the Indian authorities and in particular security forces to respect the right to freedom of assembly and expression, and comply with international human rights principles in controlling the demonstrators," according to a statement issued Thursday in Geneva. At least 13 journalists were manhandled by the Central Reserve Police Force in Srinagar as they tried to get to their offices on Sunday despite the curfew introduced earlier in the day. The journalists had passes issued on 11 August but the CRPF said they were no longer valid. In some cases, the CRPF snatched and destroyed I-cards of journalists, saying that they had orders to prevent journalists in particular from proceeding to their workplaces. News websites have been updated sporadically only because some employees have been confined to their offices by a curfew imposed in the entire Kashmir region. No restriction on any News Channels: Spokesman Srinagar, Aug 28: A government spokesman today clarified that the government had not imposed any restriction on the transmission of any of the national and international authorised news channels in the state. Reacting to the shutdown of all national and international news channels in Srinagar from this afternoon, the spokesman said that the cable operators who have the distribution rights of these channels have at their own shutdown transmission of the channels. The government has absolutely no role in it.
Back to top Go down
peace
Leading Member
Leading Member
avatar

Posts : 132
Join date : 2008-08-17

PostSubject: india ranks 120   Fri Aug 29, 2008 11:42 pm

India ranks 120 in Press Freedom Index

BILAL HUSSAIN


Srinagar, Aug 28: At a time when the world talks about freedom of press, people in Kashmir have been restricted to go through the dailies or watch news and current affairs programme on local channels. Due to curfew, local newspapers have not hit the stands and TV channels have stopped airing their programmes since Monday morning. It's days now since the international media watchdog, Reporters Without Borders, called upon Government of India to lift the restrictions on media in Kashmir. The state government on Thursday came up with a statement denying that any restriction has been placed. Reacting to this, a spokesperson of Reporters without Borders told Greater Kashmir said, "Of course, the areas affected by press freedom violations are Kashmir and North East states. He informed that in 2007, India was at the 120 rank on 169 countries in press freedom index by RSF. The index measures the state of press freedom in the world. It reflects the degree of freedom that journalists and news organizations enjoy in each country, and the efforts made by the authorities to respect and ensure respect for this freedom. According to the report by RSF Israel (Israeli territory) was at 44, Kosovo was at 60 rank and Iceland stood at the top rank. According to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and impart information and ideas through any media regardless of frontiers. "We are being restrained from serving our people with the correct and updated news," said reporter, Umar Manzor with Wadi news channel. "I had to go through 15 check points before reaching office. The manner CRPF personnel treated me was cruel," said Gowhar Ahmad, a reporter with a newspaper. The Indian Constitution, while not mentioning the word "press", provides for "the right to freedom of speech and expression" (Article 19(1) a). The government claimed that reports broadcast by certain stations violated the Cable Television Network (Regulation) Act 1995. Many journalists in the Press Enclave say that government had trampled over this right. Journalists on Monday staged demonstration here. "Give us freedom of work, let the press be free," they said.
Back to top Go down
Abode of
Guest



PostSubject: Indian Media   Sat Aug 30, 2008 1:55 am

The Indian media is nothing but a tool of the government agencies. The great Indian democracy is nothing but a sham and of course when it comes to Kashmir even their greatest writers like Arundhati Roy or Salman Rushdie would agree that India is an occupying force with no respect for democracy or secularism or basic human rights in Kashmir.

The Indians are behaving exactly like the Japanese behaved in China or Korea when the Japanese Imperial army occupied these countries.

Indian media gives more airtime to stupid bollywood gossip than it does to the confinement of 7 million Kashmiris in a prison called Kashmir.
Back to top Go down
peace
Leading Member
Leading Member
avatar

Posts : 132
Join date : 2008-08-17

PostSubject: @adi   Sun Aug 31, 2008 2:21 am

one of the best and most accurate comment i have come across on this website..
....in of my blogs i wrote that people here call kashmiri's as pakistani buddies which i have number of times made it clear that comments like these are rubbish and nonsense..
people call the freedom movement here as seperatists movement..more than a million people gathered and raised there voice against indian wrongdoings and demanded for complete independence..u cnt call that a seperatists movement..i am here writing here as a normal average kashmiri(hindu or muslim dosent matter)...would u call me also as a seperatist...yes there are hardline leaders and moderate ones too..but that is the case in every society.even india has hardline leaders and moderates..couple of days back shiv sena made it mandetory in mumbai to have hoardings in marathi..anyone would be a fool to judge indian leadership with these people...
the issue is not simple at all...it has become a complicated one..state divided into 3 countries...pandits leaving the valley...un resolutions...where to start and where to end..
i want to make a thing very clear here to all the readers..people here say that kashmir wants to become an afghan like taliban state after independence...rubbish...
that kashmir wants to become an islamic state...is there anything wrong in that..???...an islamic state gives space to people from all relegions and regions..isnt india a hindu state and if a hindu is proud of his relegion then he should have no problem in considering india as a hindu state...people say india is not a hindu state but a secular state..i ask them isnt hindu a secular relegion then..???
...surely islam is a secular relegion and by having an islamic state we can achieve the highest degree of secularism..but islamic state is a thing of a past now..for that u need to have islamic laws which rarely an islamic country adopts..what the general idea about an islamic country is the one with barbaric rulers with barbaric laws...brothers none of us has seen a pure islamic state and pls dnt judge islamic state by its rulers or its laws but pls read the history about pure islamic states which existed during the time which is known as a dark age for europeans and golden age for islamic states..that was the time when all important initial discoveries and inventions happened..the most important important invention considered next to wheel is crank which was invented by al-jazari from iraq region...those were islamic states which were the centres of relegion as well as knowledge about science,medicine,etc...
we cannot judge a process or an idea or an ideology by a handful of people..if french revolution was the bloodiest of all that does not mean all the revolutions are..if people in india consider gandhi and nehru as freedom fighters and there struglle as just and right and pure then i consider mine as just and right and pure too..by writing a few blogs here attempting to disgrace or humiliate me or my people wont humiliate me..people have written that kashmiris do not work and have the habit of surviving on packages from new delhi and survive on indian tax-payer...there can be no reply to them as there hearts and eyes are shut and they cnt hear to nor read anything in the right spirit..people here undermine kashmiris potential to survive on its own in an independent nation...ofcourse people will question our ability...so what let them..inshallah the right time will soon come when this nation of kashmir will see its first sunshine of independent kashmir and that is the right time to prove eeryone wrong.....
regards
Back to top Go down
peace
Leading Member
Leading Member
avatar

Posts : 132
Join date : 2008-08-17

PostSubject: indian democracy shatters   Sun Aug 31, 2008 5:28 pm


ANOTHER BITING AND BITTER, PERHAPS THE BITTEREST, LEAF WAS ADDED TO THE 60 YEARS SOMBER AND TRAUMATIC HISTORY OF KASHMIR ON SUNDAY MIDNIGHT.
Not only were many a Kashmiri leader who had led peaceful public rallies over a week earlier were arrested in an overnight crack down but announcement piercing the deathly silence of the night proclaiming curfew in all the 10 districts of the valley were made from megaphone fitted police vans. There is nothing new in the imposition of restriction on public movement in the state. In fact, Kashmir and curfews for indiscriminate use of the later have become synonymous. In the 60-year history, there has hardly been a year when there have not been restrictions on the assembly of people or section 144 has not been in force or when curfew has not been imposed in one or another town.
The curfew in force all over Kashmir for the past seven days is unprecedented. Terming the caging of 60 lakh men, women, children, young, old, toddlers and infants and denying them food and medicine, as curfew can be a misnomer. It will be too mild to call it even an emergency. The Peoples Democratic Party president, Mehbooba Mufti, very aptly described it as the martial law. Martial law in no way is different than the situation that has been prevailing in Kashmir during the past week.
Humanity was torn to shreds when hundreds of patients suffering from serious ailments could not be shifted to hospitals. Stories instilling awe and fear about many pregnant women gasping for breaths on roadsides and even breathing their last have been galore. Reports about men in uniform beating doctors have disturbed the entire medical fraternity. It was for the first time that restrictions had been imposed even on the movement of hospital ambulances. There are reports about the paramilitary forces firing on ambulances which were not contradicted. It is not an overstatement but a hard reality that because of scarcity of baby food in the valley and restrictions imposed by the government many crying infants were lulled to sleep by their mothers’ empty stomach. Many chronic patients depending on daily medication had to go without medicines during the unparalleled curfew.
Kashmir, particularly during past two decades, has seen many a grave situations when not only the law enforcing agencies but the entire state as such had gone out of gear. But during those tough times too, newspapers continued their publications. In recent history, it was for the first time when no newspaper was published because of strict restrictions on the movement of newsmen and other newspaper staff. It was nothing but muzzling the media when the government, besides banning private news and current affairs cable channels, very tactfully prevented publication of newspapers. The situation as has been obtaining in Kashmir since Sunday mid-night is reminiscent of the 1976 Emergency in India.
The question arises what prompted the government to create a situation which reminds one of primitive times when human values were almost irrelevant. Ostensibly, there was no reason for placing entire Kashmir under an undeclared emergency. The All Parties Hurriyat Conferences and other allied organization were holding absolutely peaceful rallies in support of their known political demands. True, the APHC rallies attracted hundreds of thousands of people and about a million had responded to the call of conglomerate at Eidgah but these rallies were so disciplined and orderly that not a brickbat was thrown on the security forces at any place. This has been acknowledged even by the known critics of Kashmiris. There was no law and order breakdown anywhere in the valley. Instead, if one looks dispassionately at the law and order situation in Kashmir in the backdrop of the months gone by, it was much more peaceful. Instead of reacting harshly with strong arm methods to the violence-free political scenario, the government should have capitalized over it and given peace a chance to strike deeper roots. It is high time for New Delhi to reassess the Kashmir situation and find out ways and means for a lasting solution to the nagging problem which cost the Indian nation no less.
Back to top Go down
Doctors
Guest



PostSubject: The Great Indian Media/Great indian laughter channels   Sun Aug 31, 2008 6:56 pm

The Great Indian Media
The fourth pillar of democracy is the media. What we see not, they show us. What we know not, they tell us. And what we understand not, they make us understand. The Indian media takes pride in calling itself non-partisan, objective & considerate to the cause of bringing out truth. They pat themselves on the back for being upright & honest in the fight for justice. Going by the precedent, it seems it is a reasonable assertion. But come Kashmir, and all such claims prove false. The apparently high moral citadel, upon which the Indian media sits, falls flat on its face when we see their dubious role in the valley of Kashmir.
The principle of objectivity, non-biased reporting of truth & a humane touch to journalism all vanishes into thin air when it’s Kashmir. Poor Kashmir once again has no hope in this farcical representation of cooked up stories on the Indian media.
Whenever a news concerns Kashmir, its either edited to falsehood according to the convenience of Indian nationality or more often it is chosen to be condemned to the dust bin in news rooms .If I was to quote examples ,there would be many. However it’s not appropriate to throw accusations without facts. So here go the facts.

While the entire valley burns with scores dying, the Indian national media choose to see the other way round. For them, some frivolous issue like an Olympic medal for India is more important. Now I fully understand that India doesn’t have national heroes & they are desperately trying to find one (by the way they found one in some bhindra, shindra). While lakhs march to the Muzzafarabad, the media in New Delhi makes it a “few thousand miscreants” .While close to a million agitate in Eidgah, it is again projected as a “few thousand disgruntled voices of the valley” .While round upon round is emptied on the chests of hapless Kashmiri`s, it is orchestrated as control of unruly mobs by the law enforcement agencies. Even after their own people get beaten (literally to death), they still choose to look the other way. How obnoxious, how unprofessional & how biased can these people get?

The fact remains that most of India suffers from intellectual bankruptcy of the highest order. For them anything that increases their TRP`S is warranted, everything else can wait. The anatomical proportions & curvatures of semi-clad item girls is their food for thought. Their distorted sense of nationalism prevents them from reporting about facts which are unpleasant to their appetite. For them we are just a drain on their nation, a rogue people who deserve the bullets that are thumped into us. So if some die in the process, it is just a part of the game of dominance for them.

On that note for the poor Kashmiri souls, here goes this one . . .

Woh qatl bhi kartey hain tow charcha nahi hota ,
Hum aah bhi bhartey hain tow ho jatey hain badnaam . . . SYED
Posted by Doctors of Kashmir
Back to top Go down
peace
Leading Member
Leading Member
avatar

Posts : 132
Join date : 2008-08-17

PostSubject: Re: Patriotic Indian Media   Sun Aug 31, 2008 7:17 pm

its very rightly said "loha hi lohay ko kat ta hai"....
u fight gun with a gun...pen with a pen...media with a media..
....the superiority of a kashmir pandit over his muslim neighbour was always coz of the use of pen..a muslim would shout and make noise against the atrocities which would be heard by a handful coz of his illeteracy thanks to his kashmiri pandit brother and the sikhs and the dogra regimes..kashmiri pandit would use his pen and write about the discrimination that the government has done against them and that will be read by people all around the world...i dnt want to write the previliges that kashmiri pandits are getting and what all jammu has been getting all these years..surely more than its share...but the fact is that now kashmiri muslims are educated and have started fighting kashmiri pandits with there same old weapon-pen..weather its pen,electronic or print media.kashmiri muslims are fighting the battle everywhere and that is a sea of change for the muslim population..
Back to top Go down
peace
Leading Member
Leading Member
avatar

Posts : 132
Join date : 2008-08-17

PostSubject: Buyers in Delhi make profit of growers’ misery   Tue Sep 02, 2008 12:10 am


BILAL HUSSAIN



Srinagar, Aug 31: In the wake of forced economic blockade on Kashmir the freight for fruit from Valley to Delhi has gone 140 per cent up from Rs 25/box some months ago to Rs 60/box, even as the rates for apple have come down at Azadpur Mandi, Delhi.
Former president, New Kashmir Fruit Association, Imtiyaz Ahmad, confirmed to Greater Kashmir that the freight has gone up. “Drivers demand high transportation cost as they are risking their lives,” he said.
He said, “Due to lesser number of vehicles taking fruit from Kashmir to outside the fruit growers/dealers have suffered enormous losses with most of the fruit in the Valley getting rotten.”
Imtiyaz said: “At present about 25 fruit laden trucks move from Valley to outside daily which is far less than the past year.” He said last year during the same period over 150 trucks laden with apples would go to different states daily from Kashmir.
“There is no way out for us except to pay for higher transportation costs,” said a grower, Tariq Ahmad.
President New Kashmir Fruit Association, Bashir Ahmad Bashir said that almost entire pear produce in the Valley has gone waste. Worried about the falling rates, he said, “Merchants at Azadpur Mandi are exploiting the traders from Valley by giving them throwaway price for their produce.”
He said at present the Kesri apple variety per box is sold at Rs 100 while as during the same period last year it was sold at Rs 200 per box. “It is a matter of grave concern for the growers and fruit traders of the Valley,” Bashir adds.
“Valley apple growers are not plucking fruit from trees so as to prevent it from getting rotten in the boxes for want of transpiration,” he said.
Back to top Go down
peace
Leading Member
Leading Member
avatar

Posts : 132
Join date : 2008-08-17

PostSubject: After guns, lathis, CRPF men use bats   Wed Sep 03, 2008 11:20 pm

Quote :
M HYDERI


Srinagar, Sep 1: After guns, lathis and verbal abuses, paramilitary CRPF troopers are now using cricket bats to thrash Kashmiris on the besieged streets of Srinagar.
At Batamaloo on Monday–a stone’s throw distance from the Police Control Room –people were shocked to see the armed troopers holding bats as their big contingency popped up after protests in the area.
And before the people would smell their motives, the troopers went on hitting them with the bats while others used traditional lathis. “Aaj in sa** ka one day khalenge,” witnesses quoted troops as shouting.
“They tried all the master blaster shots as if they were playing cricket and wanted to make centuries! Not out!” said a youth who was beaten by the troopers.
When someone asked the troopers whose bats they were using, they replied: “Yeh hamarey apnay bat hein.”
Medicos say beating by bat could cause more serious injuries than lathis.
“There are more chances of bone fracture,” said a medico requesting not to be named.
Experts say that in some situations “Carrying a bat to hit a weak opponent gives a feel of power.”
“And it also raises morale.”
Back to top Go down
peace
Leading Member
Leading Member
avatar

Posts : 132
Join date : 2008-08-17

PostSubject: Police hunt for protesters   Wed Sep 03, 2008 11:29 pm

Quote :
M HYDERI


Srinagar, Sep 2: It was return of fear of the troops of early ’90s on Monday night when police and paramilitary troopers raided Nowhatta area -the nerve center of downtown Srinagar- hunting for the local youth while the troopers beat many residents including a polio patient.
The residents said at around 11 PM, the troopers zoomed into the area in Gypsies, Scorpios and mini-trucks and cordoned the area of Rang Hamam, Nowhatta.
In no time, the troopers barged into the residential houses in the densely populated area and started inquiring about the locality youth.
Fearing raids due to past days of reported atrocities in the city, many youth had migrated to safer areas.
“But as the troopers couldn’t find their catch, they started thrashing us,” said the residents.
Some of the male family members, the complainants said, were even asked to report to the police station.
They said as the houses were being raided, cries could be heard from a Gypsy where a youth was being beaten. “None of them (youth) is here. You have misguided us and we wont leave you,” the residents quoted the troopers as saying while they kept beating the youth.
The locals believe the youth was arrested by police during daytime protests in a nearby area and was being tortured to identify other protesters.
“They are now forcing innocent people to work as informers. This will won’t ever tolerate,” shouted the people.
After the Rang Hamam episode, the troopers raided the adjoining area of Baba-ud-Din Sahib and made similar efforts in the area, reports said.
Police denies it. When contacted the superintendent of police, North City said: “ We have no such reports.”
Back to top Go down
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Patriotic Indian Media   

Back to top Go down
 
Patriotic Indian Media
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1
 Similar topics
-
» "Flesh eating Bacteria in U.S. attracting more Media attention
» Media Bias 101: Benghazi vs. Watergate and Iran-Contra
» Indian baby's case opens doors into a dark world
» The Khulla, traditional Indian Army headdress
» Should race be a factor in how the media reports crime?

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Kashmir Forum :: Kashmir forum main. :: All issues relating to Kashmir. [NO REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. YOU MAY POST ANONYMOUSLY]-
Jump to: